How to Cite County Health Rankings in Your Research

If you’re conducting research on county health rankings, you’ll want to make sure you cite the source correctly. Here’s a quick guide on how to do so.

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What are County Health Rankings?

County Health Rankings are a way to track the overall health of counties across the United States. They are released yearly by two organizations, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The rankings are based on a number of factors, including health outcomes, health factors, and social and economic factors.

How can County Health Rankings be used in research?

There are many ways that County Health Rankings can be used in research. The data and methods sections of our website provide detailed information about the indicators we use and how we obtain them. Our reports also include descriptions of the health outcomes and measures we used.

We encourage researchers to use County Health Rankings data and methods to:

-Replicate our analyses or conduct new analyses using our indicators
-Examine the relationships between different factors and health outcomes
-Analyze trends over time
-Compare counties within a state or across states
-Inform policymaking at the local, state, and national levels

What are the benefits of using County Health Rankings in research?

There are many benefits to using County Health Rankings in your research. The data is reliable and up to date, and it can provide valuable insights into the health of a community. County Health Rankings can also help you to identify needs and target interventions.

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How do County Health Rankings compare to other health ranking systems?

There are numerous other health ranking systems in existence, but the County Health Rankings provide a unique perspective. The Rankings are the only comprehensive health ranking system that uses a consistent methodology to compare counties within states. The Rankings also incorporate data from a variety of sources, including the U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

How do County Health Rankings help researchers understand health disparities?

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s County Health Rankings & Reports provide a detailed snapshot of the health of nearly every county in the United States. The Rankings are compiled by county, using a variety of measures related to health outcomes and health factors.

The County Health Rankings help researchers understand health disparities by providing reliable data that can be used to compare the health of counties across the nation. The data can also be used to examine trends over time and to identify areas of need within specific counties.

The County Health Rankings are an important tool for researchers studying health disparities because they provide a comprehensive overview of the health of a community. The data can be used to identify areas of need, track trends, and compare the health of different communities.

What are some limitations of County Health Rankings?

County Health Rankings are a snapshot of the overall health of a county. However, they do not take into account factors such as income, education, and access to healthcare. Additionally, the rankings are based on data that may be several years old.

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How can researchers use County Health Rankings to improve public health?

The County Health Rankings (CHR) are a valuable source of data for researchers studying public health. The rankings provide county-level data on health outcomes and health factors, making it possible to compare counties within a state or region. Researchers can use the CHR to identify areas of need, design interventions, and evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts.

When citing the CHR in your research, please use the following format:

[County Health Rankings & Roadmaps. Website. Accessed [month day, year].]

What are some future directions for County Health Rankings?

In the future, County Health Rankings could continue to be useful in several ways. For example,
-Researchers could use the data to study specific health problems and identify which factors contribute to those problems.
-Policymakers could use the data to pinpoint areas of need and target resources.
-County health officials could use the data to assess progress and set priorities.

To learn more about how County Health Rankings has been used in research and practice, check out our User Stories.

How can the general public use County Health Rankings?

The general public can use County Health Rankings in many ways. For example, you can use the rankings to:

-Learn about what influences health in your community
-Compare your community’s health with similar communities
-Find out what local organizations are doing to improve health
-See where your community ranks on different measures of health
-Start a conversation with elected officials, business leaders, and others about what can be done to improve health in your community

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How can policy-makers use County Health Rankings?

County Health Rankings (CHR) reports provide data on a variety of health indicators for counties across the United States. These reports can be used by policy-makers to identify areas of need and target resources to improve population health.

There are two ways to cite County Health Rankings data in your research:

1. When using data from a specific year, cite the corresponding report. For example:

According to the 2018 County Health Rankings, XYZ County has a higher rate of XYZ health indicator than the state average.

OR

XYZ County ranked ABC in the 2018 County Health Rankings for XYZ health indicator.

2. When using data from multiple years, cite the “County Health Rankings & Roadmaps” website. For example:

According to the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps website, XYZ County has consistently had a higher rate of XYZ health indicator than the state average since 2010.

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